Medieval Chamber during a flash flood

Medieval Chamber
aka: Morning Glory Arch

Moab Utah
Technical Canyoneering

          Medieval Chamber is a fun and easily accessible technical canyoneering adventure. The route contains a rappel into a short, interesting slot and a spectacular, free air rappel from the top of Morning Glory Arch.

          In normal conditions the route is dry. Some pictures on this page were taken during a massive rainstorm. This route is accessible year round, during all weather conditions.

Circle of Friends:
          Medieval Chamber is part of the "Circle of Friends" program. Members of the "Circle of Friends" have access to more specific information, explicit route information, GPS waypoints, trailhead location and detailed maps. If you would like more information on joining the "Circle of Friends" visit the sign up page.

"Circle of Friends"

Medieval Chamber  Medieval Chamber - Photo by Brett Johnson  Medieval Chamber - Photo by Brett Johnson

General Information:
          Medieval Chamber is a technical canyoneering adventure. This adventure will require 3 hours to complete. You might encounter some ankle deep wading during wet conditions. A large size group is not a problem with this route. Medieval Chamber is rated 3A II using the Canyon Rating System. The route is easy to navigate. A GPS is extremely useful in identifying waypoints on the cross-country trek to reach the top of Medieval Camber. Good map reading skills are essential.

Fee Information:
         
A Sand Flats Permit is required to enter the Sand Flats Recreational Area (SFRA), which includes the Medieval Camber canyoneering route.

Medieval Chamber - Photo by Brett Johnson 

Trailhead Information:
         
The Trailhead is located within 15 minutes of Moab, Utah. The trailhead is accessible by all vehicles in all weather conditions. Several variations of the route are provided, some of which require a vehicle shuttle and others do not.

Medieval Chamber - Photo by Brett Johnson 

Optional Loop Route:
          A loop option for those without a shuttle vehicle is provided.

Canyon History:
          The Negro Bill Canyon Trailhead was rename Grandstaff Canyon Trailhead in September 2016. The canyon itself is still officially known and labeled as Negro Bill Canyon on USGS maps, but I expect its name to be changed to Grandstaff Canyon in the future.

          The canyon was named after Bill (William) Granstaff, a black cowboy and prospector who ran cattle in the desert canyon in the late 1870s with a Canadian trapper named "Frenchie". Granstaff fled the area in 1881 after being charged with bootlegging whiskey to the Indians. His guilt or innocence in the matter was never determined. Until the early 1970s, the canyon was named 'Nigger Bill Canyon'.


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