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Lone Peak 11,253'
Wasatch Mountains
Hiking and Mountaineering

          Lone Peak is the centerpiece of Utah's first congressionally designated Wilderness Area. The Lone Peak Wilderness was established in 1977 as part of the Endangered American Wilderness Act and includes 30,088 acres in the Wasatch Range. The mountain is a beautifully huge massif visible from Salt Lake City to Provo. The rugged terrain, narrow canyons and alpine cirque are dominated by the high peak.

2012 Update:
         
As of February 2012 the sign on The Gate at the bottom of Corner Canyon reads "Street Licensed Vehicles only, no Motorcycles or ATV's". Hikers and mountain bikes are also allowed. What I referrer to as "The Gate" at the bottom of the Corner Canyon Road is now officially the Orson Smith Trailhead.

          Currently the Corner Canyon Road is open during the summer months from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. up to the Ghost Falls Trailhead (2.6 miles above The Gate). What is now being called the Ghost Falls Trailhead in the past was commonly known as the Jacobs Ladder Trailhead.

          Currently the easiest way to climb Lone Peak is to use the Jacobs Ladder Trail if the Corner Canyon Road is open. If the gate is closed the Bear Canyon Trail (also known as the Cherry Canyon Logging Trail) offers the best access. The Bear Canyon Trail is easy to access from the new Orson Smith Trailhead. Simply hike directly east, following the foot path up hill until you reach a signed junction marking Shoreline Trail and Cherry Canyon Trail.

          The Good news is the city of Draper recently purchased part of Corner Canyon so there should always be reasonable access to Lone Peak from Draper.

Lone Peak in Winter

Hiking Information:
          The summit of Lone Peak is 11,253 feet.  This peak can be climbed in summer and fall by experienced hikers.  The two historical routes to the top of Lone Peak are the Draper Ridge Trail and the Jacobs Ladder Trail.  There is no reliable water using the Draper Ridge or Jacobs Ladder route after July until the first snows. Jacobs's ladder is the shortest and fastest route to the summit; it also has a miserably steep 1 1/2-hour climb from Lone Rock to the Junction.  Draper Ridge is a bit longer, more scenic and becoming overgrown and difficult to follow.

Click Here for Map          The Bear Canyon trail is new and well maintained.  The trail also passes next to a perennial spring located high in Bear Canyon.  This route is slightly longer than Draper Ridge or Jacobs Ladder but the route is in better condition and passes a reliable water supply.

          The Draper Ridge trail has not seen any maintenance in years and is falling into disrepair and is becoming overgrown.  The Jacob Ladder trail has not seen much maintenance but is used quite heavily and is easy to follow.  Recently someone has begun maintaining a trail in Bear Canyon, which I refer to as the "Bear Canyon Trail".  This is currently the best trail on the mountain but it is also the longest. It is my understanding that this trail has recently been signed "Cherry Canyon" which is strange because the trail only dips into Cherry Canyon for a short distance.

          The gate at the bottom of Corner Canyon is closed for winter, the exact dates of opening and closing change yearly depending on road conditions and who is running Draper City on the week in question.  The road is usually open from May to December.

Winter Mountaineering:
          Lone Peak can be climbed year round by experienced mountaineers.  This is an excellent winter climb, most of the route is south facing and the snow consolidates after several sunny days.  Winter climbing involves the use of ropes, crampons and ice axe with the knowledge of their proper use.  A summit climb usually involves a multi-day adventure or a Battan Death March because the Corner Canyon road is closed in winter and the daylight hours are short.  However, the recent housing development on Traverse Ridge now provides easier winter access.

Outlaw Cabin The Summit 11,253'

Draper Ridge Trailhead:
          From the gate go 1.6 miles to the start of the trail.  The trailhead (N40 29" 58', W111 49' 50") is unmarked, it is identified by steep 4-wheel drive tracks on the left (north) side of the road and the hillside is cut away.  There is a small turnout on both sides of the road.

Draper Ridge Route:
          The Draper Ridge Trail is no longer maintained and is extremely difficult to follow. Consider the information provided here as historical information only. The Draper Ridge Trail is 6 miles to Lone Peak with an elevation gain of 6000-feet.  The route will take 5 1/2 to 6 1/2 hours to reach the summit.  From the trailhead, the route angles north across the hillside cut to join a 4-wheel drive road that switchbacks up the ridge.  The route will criss-cross an incredibly steep 4-wheel drive track that heads straight up the ridge.  Follow the switchbacks and count the number of times you get to the southern most point.  At the fourth southern switchback, an easily visible trail (N40 30" 14', W111 49' 27") leads off to the right (east).   Follow the trail, which drops slightly into the gully before beginning a steady climb up a minor ridge between Cherry Canyon and the Movie Rocks.  The trail is deeply eroded in places as you climb through oak and mountain mahogany.  The trail will eventually lead to an open grassy ridge, which is followed to the junction of the Jacobs Ladder Trail (N40 30' 46", W111 47' 19").

Jacobs Ladder Trailhead:
          From the gate go 2.6 miles to the start of the trail.  The trailhead (N40 29' 39", W111 48' 59") is unmarked, it is identified by a large turnout on the right side of the road and three 4-wheel drive tracks climbing the road bank on the left (north) side of the road.

Jacobs Ladder Route:
          The Jacobs Ladder Trail is 5 1/2 miles to Lone Peak with an elevation gain of 5650-feet.   The route will take 5 to 6 hours to reach the summit.  From the trailhead, follow the three 4-wheel drive tracks on the north side of the road, which feed together in a short distance.  Continue to hike the 4-wheel drive track to the top of a steep hill (N40 29' 46", W111 48' 55") approximately 7 minutes from the trailhead.   At the top of the steep hill the road forks, with one road leading down into a deep gully and than climbing to the Movie Rocks where Devil's Brigade was filmed.  The route that leads to Jacobs Ladder turns right (east) on top of the steep hill and follows the spur ridge.  Hike up the spur ridge trail, other trails and a 4-wheel drive track will feed into the trail, as long as you are heading up, you are traveling in the correct direction.  Continue to Lone Rock (N40 29' 53", W111 47' 22"), an outcropping with a big drop to the east and south.  The trail drops slightly to the north and than climbs steeply for 1 1-2 hours until the trail leads to an open grassy ridge and a junction with the Draper Ridge Trail (N40 30' 46", W111 47' 19").

Summit Ridge in WinterJunction to Summit:
          From the junction of Draper Ridge trail and Jacobs Ladder trail (N40 30' 46", W111 47' 19") to the summit is an easier hike with excellent scenery.  From the junction follow the trail east a short distance to a rise where a meadow and the summit of Lone Peak is visible.  Many people get lost just past the meadow so pay attention to your route from this vantage point.  Your route is to follow the trail down and cross the meadow, cross the stream, and to climb the saddle to the east of the meadow.  In the meadow, there is a very good trail and junction (N40 30' 55", W111 46' 43").   The fork to the north (left) leads to the Outlaw Cabin.  DO NOT follow this trail unless you wish to visit the Outlaw Cabin.  The fork east (straight ahead) leads to the small saddle. From the saddle (N40 30' 59", W111 46' 27"), there is no trail but your route is clearly visible.  Enter the cirque and follow the drainage north.   Pay attention to where you entered the cirque since you must find this exit point when you return.  Head for the obvious saddle to the north.  From the saddle, follow the ridge east to the summit.  The summit is the triangular peak farthest left along the top of the shear wall.  The last 1/4 mile to the summit is very exposed and requires scrambling.  Please use caution and know your abilities.  The summit is a small flat toped rock.

Outlaw Cabin:
          The trail to the Outlaw Cabin is 3/4 mile east from the junction of Draper Ridge trail and Jacob's Ladder trail.  The well-traveled trail is located on the east side of the meadow.  Follow the trail north 1/2 mile to a minor saddle.  The trail than descends 200-feet in 1/4 mile to a meadow.  The Outlaw Cabin (N40 31" 12', W111 46' 53") is located on the west end of the meadow in the pine trees.  The cabin has a sign that states "Enjoy It, Don't Destroy It".  The Outlaw Cabin is a fun place to visit.  The Outlaw Cabin was used in October 1997 to save the lives of a Draper family who were caught in an early season blizzard high on the mountain.

Bear Canyon Trailhead:
          From the gate go 1.1 miles to the start of the trail.  The trailhead (N40 30' 27", W111 50' 08") is unmarked.  It is identified by a large turnout on the right (west) side of the road.  On the left (east) side of the road there is a 4-wheel drive track which switchbacks twice and than climbs straight up the ridge, kind of hard to miss.  This is also a trailhead for the Shoreline Trail.

Bear Canyon Trail:
          The "Bear Canyon Trail" is the best trail on the mountain, it is very well maintained and easy to follow.  My thanks, to whomever is doing the maintenance. It is possible to reach the Outlaw Cabin and the summit of Lone Peak by the Bear Canyon Trail which reaches into the upper bowl of Bear Canyon. 

          From the Shoreline Trailhead (N40 30' 27", W111 50' 08") follow the Shoreline Trail north along the bench for 1 mile.  At first the route is a 4-wheel drive track but after a short distance the track becomes a trail and is signed "Shoreline Trail".  Do not follow the 4-wheel drive track which switchbacks up the ridge.  After hiking along the bench for 1 mile or approximately 20 minutes you will reach a spot where a well defined trail starting at the Corner Canyon gate crosses the shoreline trail.  This junction (N40 31' 15", W111 49' 46") is where the Bear Canyon Trail leaves the Shoreline Trail and is identified by a large sign post with a sign "Cherry Canyon".  If you reach the bridge crossing Bear Creek you have gone 1/4 mile to far north.  The Bear Canyon Trail (Improperly identified Cherry Canyon Trail) climbs east up the ridge south of Bear Canyon, dips breifly into Cherry Canyon and drops into Bear Canyon and continues to a year round spring (N40 30" 58', W111 47' 35").  The route next climbs to the Outlaw Cabin (N40 31" 12', W111 46' 53").  From the Outlaw Cabin you can follow the trail which begins behind the cabin to the standard Jacobs Ladder - Draper Ridge route.  It is also possible to continue following the Bear Canyon drainage up to the ridge, this is the shortest route but there is no trail.   The upper drainage is very easy to travel without bushwhacking.  From the ridge, you can see Lone Peak and route find your way to the summit. 

          The Bear Canyon Trail is often used by horses to gain access to the Outlaw Cabin and the upper mountain.  Hiking this trail to the Outlaw Cabin is a very enjoyable destination hike.  Using this trail it will take approximately 3 1/2 hours to reach the Outlaw Cabin and 6 hours to reach the summit.

Trail of the Eagle:
          This route is suggested for family members looking for a fun morning or afternoon hike or for very experienced hikers looking to test there summiting skills.  The "Trail of the Eagle" is a well maintained trail which leads to a rock outcropping high on the mountain.  From the rock outcropping it is possible to reach the summit of Lone Peak by using an unmaintained trail which reaches into the upper bowl of Little Willow Canyon.  

          The Trailhead is the same as the Bear Canyon Trail.  From the Shoreline Trailhead (N40 30' 27", W111 50' 08") follow the Shoreline Trail north along the bench for 1 1/2 miles.  At first the route is a 4-wheel drive track but after a short distance the track becomes a trail and is signed "Shoreline Trail".  Do not follow the 4-wheel drive track which switchbacks up the ridge.  After hiking along the bench for 1 1/2 miles or approximately 40 minutes you will reach the signed junction (N40 31' 29", W111 49' 31") of Shoreline Trail and Trail of the Eagle.  You will know your getting close when you cross Bear Creek using a unique bridge.  The signed junction is 200-yards beyond the bridge over Bear Creek. 

          Trail of the Eagle is maintained for approximately one-mile past the junction and climbs to a small rock outcropping.  Hiking to the rock outcropping makes a very easy and enjoyable afternoon or morning hike.   Most family members will enjoy hiking to this destination.

          From the rock outcropping an unmaintained trail climbs north into Little Willow Canyon.   The trail is hard to follow since it is seldom used.  The trail passes through pine trees on the northern slopes, which is cool and refreshing during hot weather.   The trail disappears when it reaches Little Willow Creek high in the basin.   When you reach Little Willow Creek, follow the drainage up to the ridge.  The upper basin is very easy to travel without bushwhacking but there is no trail.  From the ridge, you can see Lone Peak and route find your way to the summit.  The route will take at least 6 hours to reach the summit.  I have noted the trail and route's general location on the map.  Hiking above the rock outcropping is a very poor and difficult route and is not recommended for those looking for fun.  If you want real punishment this is your route.

Sawmill Trail:
          This route is suggested for family members looking for a fun morning or afternoon hike or for very experienced hikers looking to test there skills.  The "Sawmill Trail" is a well maintained trail which leads to the top of Big Willow.  This is a very enjoyable trail to hike.  You will visit a rock outcropping/viewpoint, followed by a visit to a nice waterfall and cascades and than up to Bells Canyon Reservoir or the summit of Lone Peak if you are tough enough.

          The Trailhead (N40 32' 25", W111 48' 45") is located at Hidden Valley Park in Sandy, Utah.  This park is located on Wasatch Boulevard at about 11700 south. The park is next to a LDS church.

          From the parking lot follow the paved trail 100 yard southeast to a bench and sign pointing the way to the "Bonneville Shoreline Trail".  Follow the sign and 4 wheel drive track as it climbs the mountain 300 yards to a red gate (N40 32' 22", W111 48' 35").  At this point a sign points the way south to continue on the Bonneville Shoreline Trail but to reach the Sawmill Trail you must pass around the red gate and climb the hill for 250 yards.  At the top of the hill the road will flatten out and turn sharp to the right.   At this point you will notice a trail that leads south into trees; this is the trail (N40 32' 25", W111 48' 26"). If you get to where the water goes under the road through a cement pipe you have gone about 100 yards too far.

          Continue up the trail as far as you desire.  After one mile you will reach an avalanche warning sign (N40 31' 47", W111 47' 55") and a junction in the trail.  The Right (East) Fork leads 150 yards down to a stream with a small waterfall and cascades. The Left (North) Fork climbs over the ridge into Big Willow and climbs to the top of the canyon.

          For those who are serious hikers this trail provides access to an assortment of adventures including Upper Bells Canyon Reservoir and Lone Peak.

My Favorite Routes:
          
If a car shuttle is available I would suggest climbing Lone Peak using the Jacobs Ladder Route and descending by visiting the Outlaw Cabin and continuing down the Bear Canyon Trail.  This allows you to visit much of the mountain and refill empty water bottles at the beautiful spring in Bear Canyon.  The change of scenery this semi-loop hike creates is also welcome.


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